Fear Not

Drawing from this week’s sermon: Set Free From Fear, here are some ‘Fear Not’ assurances from the Bible, and the one proper form of fear needed.

IT’S SURPRISING HOW MANY ‘FEAR NOT’S’ ARE FOUND IN GOD’S WORD

• When Feeling Overwhelmed (Isaiah 41:13)
• When Feeling Forgotten (Isaiah 43:1)
• When Surrounded by Enemies (2 Kings 6:16)
• When Tempted to Loneliness (Isaiah 41:10)
• When Tempted to Despair (2 Chronicles 20:15)
• When you fear losing everything (Hebrews 13:5–6)
• When threatened by criticism of your faith (Matthew 10:26)
• When threatened with physical harm (Matthew 10:28)
• When Feeling Worthless and Forgotten (Matthew 10:31)

For God has not given us a spirit of fear,
but of power and of love and of a sound mind.

2 Timothy 1:7

BUT THERE IS ONE PROPER FORM OF FEAR…
“The Fear of the Lord”

It is Defined as Extreme Reverence and Awe Toward God
• The “fear of the Lord” is the beginning of knowledge (Prov. 1:7)
• The “fear of the Lord” will cause one to hate evil (Pr 8:13)
• The “fear of the Lord” will prolong life (Pr 10:27)
• The “fear of the Lord” is a fountain of life (Pr 14:26-27)
• The “fear of the Lord” leads to a satisfying life, sparing one from much evil (Pr 19:23)
• The “fear of the Lord” is the way to riches, honor, and life! (Pr 22:4)


“The remarkable thing about fearing God is that when you fear God, you fear nothing else, whereas if you do not fear God, you fear everything else.”

–Oswald Chambers

Calm Enough to Consider

“He who has knowledge spares his words, and a man of understanding is of a calm spirit” (Proverbs 17:27).

IT IS DANGEROUS TO LET OUR MINDS BECOME SO AGITATED THAT WE CAN’T CONSIDER OUR ACTIONS CAREFULLY. Our adversary, the devil, specializes in confusion. He loves to prey upon minds that are torn and upset by multiple worries, and he often has his greatest success in tempting us when we’re so beset by cares that we act on impulse, failing to consider the consequences of our actions.

Solomon observed that “a man of understanding is of a calm spirit.” But how can we have a calm spirit when many stressful things come at us at once, all of which have to be considered? There surely can be no question that this is one of life’s most difficult challenges, and there are no easy answers. Like most difficult things, however, cultivating a calm mind is a matter of training.

Our brains may have a more complicated connection to our spirits than the other parts of the body, but the brain (i.e., the physiological mind) is still a part of the body, and as such, it has to be trained to serve, rather than hinder, the spirit. Naturally unruly and seemingly with a will of its own, the mind has to be put in its place, disciplined, and taught to help us get to heaven.

Training our minds to be calm is like every other kind of training in that it has to be done in small steps. It’s a matter of incremental growth over time. What we do is put ourselves on a deliberate regimen of training, and we “exercise” every day. We find some little thing we can do today to help calm our minds, and that victory encourages us to do the same tomorrow.

At the very least, we need to consciously value a calm spirit. We need to pursue it, and when we find ourselves without it, we need to be wise enough to see the danger we’re in and make godly efforts to recover our calmness as soon as possible. If we can’t always be calm, we can certainly grow in that direction. Today, like every day, there is some step you can take that will lead to a mind that’s more peaceful — and more careful. What is that step?

“A calm mind is a great asset in this life. Without it your devotional life will not bear much fruit. If your heart is troubled, you are vulnerable to the enemy of the soul. When you are agitated, you are not able to make good decisions. You will stumble into snares” (Lawrence Scupoli).

Gary Henry – WordPoints.com

Thomas the Apostle Lesson

Bible Class: LEARNING FROM JESUS The Master Teacher

Thomas––The man who became convinced by doubting. PDF file.

––HE HAD GREAT COURAGE BUT TENDED TO SEE THE WORST OUTCOME

1. What did Thomas say to the other disciples? (Jn 11:1-16) What does this tell you about his faith?

2. Why do some tend to see the worst rather than the best outcome? How was Thomas like this?

3. Does this change the “doubting Thomas” stereotype he has been labeled with?

––HE WANTED TO UNDERSTAND BUT COULD NOT SEE PAST THE CROSS

4. Why can we be thankful Thomas asked Jesus this question?   (John 14:1–6)

5. What can we learn from the answer Jesus gave? How is this truth difficult to grasp for so many?

6. How does unmet expectations and unanswered questions affect our faith?

––HE WANTED TO BELIEVE BUT COULD NOT SEE PAST THE GRAVE

7. How might it be difficult to realize Jesus must die before He can become King?

8. Why would Thomas say this?   (John 20:24-25)

9. How is a person’s faith affected when they separate themselves from other believers? (20:24)

––HE BECAME A MAN OF FAITH, CONVICTION AND DEVOTION TO CHRIST

10. Is it wrong to have doubts? Is our faith a “blind faith” or a faith based on evidence? (20:24ff)

11. What does this reveal about Jesus who was willing to show Thomas the evidence? (20:26-28)

12.  What is the blessing Jesus gives, and who is it given to? (20:29)